Vulgates Galore!

Wikipedia gives you the basic rundown, but here’s a more practical overview. See how all the different Vulgate translations in existence affect the wording of Psalm 90/91!

First off, though, you should know that I’m putting in line breaks for readability. Most Vulgates run along like prose, without line breaks. Also, not a lot of punctuation. (That’s what declensions are for!)

Version 1: (What I mostly used)

qui habitat in abscondito Excelsi
in umbraculo Domini commorabitur
dicens Domino spes mea
et fortitudo mea
Deus meus confidam in eum
quia ipse liberabit te de laqueo venantium
de morte insidiarum
in scapulis suis obumbrabit tibi
et sub alis eius sperabis
scutum et protectio veritas eius
non timebis a timore nocturno
a sagitta volante per diem
a peste in tenebris ambulante
a morsu insanientis meridie
cadent a latere tuo mille
et decem milia a dextris tuis
ad te autem non adpropinquabit

Version 2: (This seems to be the version St. Thomas More used; the phrases seem familiar.)

Qui habitat in adjutorio Altissimi,
in protectione Dei cæli commorabitur.
Dicet Domino: Susceptor meus es tu, et refugium meum;
Deus meus, sperabo in eum.
Quoniam ipse liberavit me de laqueo venantium,
et a verbo aspero.
Scapulis suis obumbrabit tibi,
et sub pennis ejus sperabis.
Scuto circumdabit te veritas ejus:
non timebis a timore nocturno;
a sagitta volante in die,
a negotio perambulante in tenebris,
ab incursu, et dæmonio meridiano.
Cadent a latere tuo mille,
et decem millia a dextris tuis;
ad te autem non appropinquabit.

Version 3: (The ultra-current Vatican version of the Vulgate — the Nova Vulgata.)

Qui habitat in protectione Altissimi,
sub umbra Omnipotentis commorabitur.
Dicet Domino: “Refugium meum
et fortitudo mea, Deus meus, sperabo in eum”.
Quoniam ipse liberabit te de laqueo venantium
et a verbo maligno.
Alis suis obumbrabit tibi,
et sub pennas eius confugies;
scutum et lorica veritas eius.
Non timebis a timore nocturno,
a sagitta volante in die,
a peste perambulante in tenebris,
ab exterminio vastante in meridie.
Cadent a latere tuo mille
et decem milia a dextris tuis;
ad te autem non appropinquabit.

2 Comments

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2 responses to “Vulgates Galore!

  1. Lucia Rosa

    Wow, that is confusing. I’m fairly sure the second one is the original Vulgate of St. Jerome, because it sounds more familiar and I don’t see what other one St. Thomas could have used. I wonder what the first one is. Your line breaks are very useful!

  2. The second is the familiar one for me too, the one we sing during Holy Week. It’s a gorgeous psalm.

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