Nicolas Le Floch: Good Historical Mystery Show

Nicolas Le Floch is a French-made historical mystery show. It came out in 2008, and I’m sorry that I’ve never seen it before. The scenery of old Paris and Versailles is great, the portrayal of the era and its point of view is wonderfully exact, and the stories are a mix of mystery and swashbuckling adventure. What more could you ask?

It’s 1761. Nicolas, our sleuth hero, is a commissaire for the Paris police. He has a team of investigators (including an inspecteur who often masquerades as a servant or constable), sources (including a sort of Paris Baker Street Irregulars), and access to the weird world of French government informants.

(Yes, the king and Cardinal Richelieu really did employ some of the famous Paris beggars as an army of informants and couriers.)

However, he also has to deal with the mean streets of Paris, court intrigue, plots, poisonings, banditry, his boss, and all manner of other troubles. And since he’s a French detective whose last name is not Maigret, he is statutorily required to have extremely consenting sex with extremely consenting women.

But he is really trying to fight for justice, even if his means are sometimes questionable. Very questionable. Or at least, very French.

It’s a really good show with great stories. It’s so refreshing to watch a historical show with characters that have historical motives, feelings, and worries, instead of being copies of modern people. Also, the actor does a great job playing a complicated character caught between worlds, and he has plenty of French charm as well as French shrewdness. The supporting actors and minor cast are also a joy. The music is beautiful, and there’s a great scene reproducing baroque opera. Even the horses are awesome.

It’s not a show for young kids who are mystery fans, because there are suggestive situations, and there’s a fair amount of talk about court scandals with both sexes. But it should be okay for older folks.

Nicolas Le Floch is adapted from a series of French historical mysteries written by Jean-Francois Parot. (“Les enquêtes de Nicolas Le Floch, commissaire au Châtelet.”) Six of the books have been translated into English by the repetitiously named Howard Howard, and they are available on Kindle. There is an audiobook edition in French.

The German translation of one of the books appears to be free on Kindle, but that doesn’t do me much good.

Nicolas Le Floch is available free from many libraries via the Hoopla app, which now includes video download capabilities for mobile devices.

PS – The Great Courses are now available on Hoopla, also for free. Which is cheaper than the Amazon channel, given the capacity to download, although only a fixed number of people can borrow the same video at a time from your library. Courses include “Learning French,” “Latin 101,” and “Greek 101.” (Still no downloadable textbook, but free!)

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Filed under Cartoons/Animation/Video, Recommendations

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